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Entrepreneurial and Small Business Stressors, Experienced Stress, and Well Being Vol: 18

Pamela L. Perrewé
Florida State University, USA

Peter D. Harms
The University of Alabama, USA

Chu-Hsiang (Daisy) Chang
Michigan State University, USA


Product Details
Format:
Hardback
ISBN:
9781839823978
Published:
17 Aug 2020
Publisher:
Emerald Publishing Limited
Dimensions:
300 pages - 152 x 229mm
Series:
Research in Occupational Stress and Well Being
Volume 18 of Research in Occupational Stress and Well-Being is focused on the stress and well-being related to Entrepreneurship and Small Businesses. This volume focuses on entrepreneurial and small business owners; stress, health, and well-being as it relates to personal, work, and success outcomes. The literature linking stress with entrepreneurship and small business has been somewhat scattered to date in that stress has been treated as an antecedent of decisions to create new ventures, a frequent outcome experienced by entrepreneurs and small business owners (or self-employed businesses), and a moderator of the entrepreneurial process. We attempt to resolve some of the inconsistences theoretically and to better frame future research in this important area of study. We have seven chapters that cover topics from theory-building to context in small businesses to utilizing resources. We have divided our seven chapters into three sections. In the first section, we include three chapters that examine new theories, frameworks and future research agendas in entrepreneurship. In the second section, we have two chapters that examine contexts, specifically, heterogeneity and non-family membership in small businesses. In the final section, we have chapters that examine the important role of resources in entrepreneurship. We believe this volume offers critical analyses of research on stress and entrepreneurship as well new frameworks for future research.
Chapter 1. Worker health and well-being in the gig economy: A proposed framework and research agendaMelissa G. Keith, Peter D. Harms, and Alexander C. Long
Chapter 2. Stress events theory: A theoretical framework for understanding entrepreneurial behaviorMichael P. Lerman, Timothy P. Munyon, and Jon C. Carr
Chapter 3. Stress and well-being in entrepreneurship: A critical review and future research agendaJoshua V. White and Vishal K. Gupta
Chapter 4. More specific than small: Identifying key factors to account for the heterogeneity in stress among small businessesAlice M. Brawley Newlin
Chapter 5. Struggling to survive: Non-family member employees, the family, and stress in family firm startupsFrank C. Butler and John A. Martin
Chapter 6. Picking up the reigns: The crucial role of psychological capital in the transition from long-term unemployment to entrepreneurship;Karlijn Massar, Annika Nübold, Robert van Doorn, and Karen Schelleman-Offermans
Chapter 7. Accruing and leveraging untapped and underdeveloped resources and technologies as a means to manage stress in entrepreneurial venturesJulie Dyrdek Broad
Pamela L. Perrewé is the Robert O. Lawton Distinguished Professor, the Haywood and Betty Taylor Eminent Scholar of Business Administration and Distinguished Research Professor at Florida State University. She has focused her research interests in the areas of job stress, coping, organizational politics, emotion and personality. Dr. Perrewé has published over 35 book chapters and over 140 journal articles in journals such as Academy of Management Journal, Journal of Management, Journal of Applied Psychology, Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Journal of Organizational Behavior and Personnel Psychology. She has fellow status with Southern Management Association, the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology, the American Psychological Association, and the Association for Psychological Science. Finally, she is the founding editor and the co-editor of the annual series, Research in Occupational Stress and Well Being published by Emerald Publishing. 

Peter D. Harms received his Ph.D. from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He is currently the Morrissette Faculty Fellow in Leadership and Ethics for the Culverhouse College of Business at the University of Alabama. His research focuses on the assessment and development of personality, leadership, and psychological well-being. He has published over 100 articles in leading management and psychology journals. He currently serves on the scientific advisory board of Hogan Assessment Systems and has engaged in research partnerships with the U.S. Army, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and the U.S. Department of Labor. 

Chu-Hsiang (Daisy) Chang is an associate professor at the Department of Psychology of Michigan State University. She received her Ph.D. in industrial and organizational psychology from the University of Akron. Her research interests focus on occupational health and safety, leadership, and motivation. Specifically, she studies issues related to occupational stress, workplace violence, and how employee motivation and organizational leadership intersect with issues concerning employee health and well-being. Her work has been published in Academy of Management Review, Academy of Management Journal, Journal of Applied Psychology, Journal of Organizational Behavior, Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Psychological Bulletin, and Work & Stress. She has served as an associated editor at Applied Psychology: An International Review and Journal of Organizational Behavior and is currently serving as an associated editor at Journal of Applied Psychology.

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