Wisconsin "Government and Business" and the History of Heterodox Economic Thought Vol: 22


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Product Details
Format:
Hardback
ISBN:
9780762310906
Published:
18 Feb 2004
Publisher:
Emerald Group Publishing Limited
Dimensions:
392 pages - 156 x 234 x 22mm
Series:
Research in the History of Economic Thought and Methodology

Categories:

Contains two groups of archival materials. One group includes lecture notes from courses given at the University of Wisconsin by Edwin E. Witte and Robert Lampman on the economic role of government. The second group includes papers from a conference on the history of 20th century heterodox economics.
Wisconsin "government and business. "Government and business" at the University of Wisconsin in the mid-1950's: Introduction (W.J. Samuels). Edwin Emil Witte's course on "government and business," economics 146, Fall 1954 (W.J. Samuels). Edwin Emil Witte's course on "the role of government in the economy," economics 246, 1954-1955 (W.J. Samuels). Robert Lampman's course on "government and business," economics 146, Fall 1955 (W.J. Samuels). Papers from a conference on the history of heterodox economics in the 20th century. Papers from a conference on the history of heterodox economics in the 20th century: Introduction (W.J. Samuels). Group one: Heterodoxy at the department level. Heterodox economics at the University of Manitoba (F. Baragar). Repression at the University of Michigan (E.H. Shaffer). The Spartan School of Institutional Economics at Michigan State University (A.A. Schmid). The Oklahoma "institutionalist" school (W.R. Brazelton). Economic heterodoxy at the University of Texas at mid-twentieth century (D. Hamilton). Heterodox economics at the University of Utah (E.K. Hunt, A.M. Sievers). Group two: Heterodox ideas and their evolution. The twentieth century trend of institutionalism in mainstream economics journals (R.J. Phillips, D. Kinnear). Lament for economics, or how Barbara Wooton gave it all away and became a sociologist (J.E. King). Marxist theory: From class struggle to political economy (C. Everling). The urban land economics tradition: How heterodox economic theory survives in the real estate appraisal profession (R. Ramsey).

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