Perspectives on Libraries as Institutions of Human Rights and Social Justice Vol: 41

John Carlo Bertot
University of Maryland, USA

Paul T. Jaeger
University of Maryland, USA

Ursula Gorham
University of Maryland, USA

Natalie Greene Taylor
University of Maryland, USA

Paul T. Jaeger
University of Maryland, USA


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Product Details
Format:
Hardback
ISBN:
9781786350589
Published:
07 Mar 2016
Publisher:
Emerald Group Publishing Limited
Dimensions:
456 pages - 152 x 229 x 28mm
Series:
Advances in Librarianship
Academic, public, school, and special libraries are all institutions of human rights and social justice, with an increasingly apparent commitment to equality, to ethical principles based on rights and justice, and to programs that meet needs related to human rights and social justice. Key topics at the intersection of information, human rights, social justice, and technology include information access and literacy, digital inclusion, education, and social services, among many others. Edited by Ursula Gorham, Natalie Greene Taylor, and Paul T. Jaeger, this volume is devoted to the ideals, activities, and programs in libraries that protect human rights and promote social justice. With contributions from researchers, educators, and practitioners from a range of fields, this book is an important resource for library professionals in all types of libraries, a reference for researchers and educators about all types of libraries, and an introduction to those in other fields about the contributions of libraries to human rights and social justice.
Volume Editors’ Introduction: “Libraries as Institutions of Human Rights and Social Justice” - Ursula Gorham, Natalie Greene Taylor and Paul T. Jaeger Social Justice Concepts and Public Libraries: A Case Study - Punit Dadlani Privacy, Intellectual Freedom, and Self-Respect: Technological and Philosophical Lessons for Libraries - Anna Lauren Hoffmann Libraries and Human Rights—Working Together to Reach Our Full Potential - Vivianne Fogarty Library Services to Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs): Strategies for More Proactive Approach by Public Libraries in Nigeria - Vicki Lawal Public Libraries and Social Inclusion: An Update from South Africa - Christine Stilwell Libraries as Agents of Human Rights Protection and Social Justice on Behalf of Sexual Minorities in India: An Action-Based Manifesto for Progressive Change - Bharat Mehra and Lisette Hernandez Libraries “Coming Out” in Support of LGBTQIA+? Human Rights and Social Justice - Peggy McEachreon The Prison Law Library: A Fourteenth Amendment Necessity - Brandon Nichole Wright The Role of the Union in Promoting Social Justice - Sarah Barriage Critical Reflection on Librarianship and Human Rights: A Book and Continuing Endeavor - Toni Samek Human Rights without Cultural Imperialism - Kay Mathiesen Archives and Human Rights: Questioning Notions of Information and Access - Michelle Caswell and Ricardo Punzalan The Social Justice Collaboratorium: Illuminating Research Pathways between Social Justice and Library and Information Studies - RaShauna Brannon, LaVerne Gray, Miraida Morales, Myrna E. Morales, Mario H. Ram?rez and Elnora Kelly Tayag Counter-Storytelling in the LIS Curriculum - Nicole A. Cooke Open Access, Privacy, and Human Rights: A Case Study on Ethics in Library and Information Sciences Education - Joachim Schopfel Raranga te kete aronui: Weaving Social and Cultural Inclusion into New Zealand Library and Information Science Education - Nicole M. Gaston, Alison Fields, Philip Calvert and Spencer Lilley The Role of Students in Diversity and Inclusion in Library and Information Science - Fiona Jardine Human Rights, Social Justice, and the Activist Future of Libraries - Ursula Gorham, Natalie Greene Taylor and Paul T. Jaeger
Paul T. Jaeger, University of Maryland, Series Co-Editor John Carlo Bertot, University of Maryland, Series Co-Editor Karen Kettnich, University of Maryland, Series Managing Editor
Editors Gorham, Taylor, and Jaeger present readers with a collection of academic and working professional perspectives on contemporary and emerging trends in the field of library science and what it means to be a librarian. The contributions are focused on conceptualizing libraries as institutions of human rights and social justice, providing library services to marginalized populations, and human rights and social justice issues in the library professions and library education. Ursula Gorham, Natalie Greene Taylor, and Paul T. Jaeger are faculty members of the University of Maryland. Distributed in North America by Turpin Distribution.

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