Genes, Climate, and Consumption Culture: Connecting the Dots

Jagdish N. Sheth
Emory University, USA


List price $56.00 Add to basket
Product Details
Format:
Paperback
ISBN:
9781787434127
Published:
31 Aug 2017
Publisher:
Emerald Publishing Limited
Dimensions:
272 pages - 129 x 198mm
Series:
Emerald Points
Drawing from decades of research, Genes, Climate, and Consumption Culture: Connecting the Dots demonstrates how climate dictates culture and consumption. The author shows that human genes are climatic adaptations over thousands of years of evolution, which has resulted in the dramatic differences between people’s food, clothing, and shelter choices. Most importantly, the book discusses how many of the fundamental differences between cultures, with respect to time, space, friendship, and technology, are responses to their particular climate.

Readers will learn how to challenge their assumptions about what types of products and services foreign markets want. They will learn how to examine local markets vis-à-vis climate and culture, either changing their products accordingly or delivering entirely new offerings.
Preface  
Introduction: Climate and the History of Man 
1, We Are What We Eat 
2, What to Wear? 
3, A Roof Overhead  
4, Your time or Mine?  
5, Individualism and Collectivism 
6, Embrace of Technology and Dominion over Nature 
Conclusion
"Jag Sheth's Climate, Culture and Consumption is an intriguing treasure trove of insights about how climate has effected human civilization, evolution, food consumption, health, clothing, housing, family structure, sense of time and space, cooperation versus competition, and much more. If Jared Diamond's Guns, Germs and Steel was insightful in explaining the rise and fall of human cultures, Sheth's CCC is equally insightful in explaining everything from how much Coca Cola we drink (his starting point) to what we wear, where the Industrial Revolution began, and why some people handle alcohol better than others. It sparkles with brilliant observations and will be hard to put down." 

Russell Belk, York University Distinguished Research Professor

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